6260 State Rd., Parma, OH 44134 | Parma Animal Shelter, 501(c)(3) organization
Volunteers participate in American Kennel Club Good Citizen dog training

Volunteers participate in American Kennel Club Good Citizen dog training

Over the past 8 weeks, Parma Animal Shelter volunteers have been participating in American Kennel Club Good Citizen dog training. This pawsome training is not only helping us become better volunteers, but also helping our pups become more adoptable and giving them more enrichment in their time at PAS. We are so proud to be offering this program! Our volunteers have had nothing but great experiences, class participant Sue Bohanek gives us an inside look:

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A Big Thanks to All Our Doggie Swim Participants!

A Big Thanks to All Our Doggie Swim Participants!

Put your paws together for our Doggie Swim participants! On Sunday, August 13th over 180 dogs joined us at Walter’s Grove Pool! It was a beautiful day.  We saw huge jumps in the pool, packs of goldens playing fetch, lots of splashing and lots of running around the pool. We can’t decide who enjoyed themselves more – the dogs or the humans!

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Thank you for a great Classic Car Show!

Thank you for a great Classic Car Show!

Thank you for a great Classic Car Show!

Sunday, June 4th was a big day for Parma Animal Shelter – we raised $5,500 at our Classic Car Show! We couldn’t have done it without you -thank you to all of you who braved the rain for this spectacular event.

We would also like to thank the wonderful Custom Color & Collision, Baird Wealth Management, Axelrod Buick GMC and all of our sponsors.

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How to help a kitten you find outside

How to help a kitten you find outside

Wait and Watch: The mother offers her newborn kittens their best chance for survival so wait and watch as long as you safely can for her to return before removing them. Mom’s may be gone as long as 4-5 hours to get food. Also, be aware if you find a single kitten please wait at a safe distance as the mother may be moving the kittens to a safer place which may take some time when moving several kittens one at a time.

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Watch the First Seconds. After That You’ll Want to Adopt Pita.

Dear Potential Adopter, I, Becky S., Parma Animal Shelter Head Shift Leader and Adoption Counselor, would like you to meet our Pita. She has been living in our shelter for over two years; Pita hasn’t been able to find her forever home, yet. Until recently, Pita was very shy and only wanted to stay in her cage. A caring person found Pita outside with another cat. They were friendly cats so they brought them to our shelter. However, some outdoor cats do not adjust quickly to shelter life and the confinement and all the other cats. This was our Pita. She was scared and shy and just sat in her cage initially. Soon, Pita would want the volunteers to pet her and give her attention. However, she still would not come out of her cage. This went on for a long time. Pita became many of our volunteers favorite because she was a playful and affectionate cat, but only in her cage. When we would take Pita out to meet potential adopters, she would not be her lovable self. She wanted the attention of the potential adopter, but was not sure how to act and sometimes gave love bites and scratched. This is the exact opposite of her true personality. Over the last two years, I’ve gotten very close to Pita and love her dearly. However, my home is already at its max and I can’t adopt her. Why You Want to Adopt Pita Over the last two months Pita has bloomed into this sweet outgoing cat she always was prior to coming to the shelter. Pita doesn’t mind the other cats as... read more

3 Alternative Solutions to Declawing Cats

Declawing cats. It sounds like a good idea, especially if you don’t want your furniture scratched up. But is it the humane thing to do? Do you know how cats are declawed? One way is to amputate with a scalpel or guillotine clipper. Ouch! Stitches or surgical glue is used to close the wounds — the feet are bandaged. Laser surgery is a more modern way to declaw cats. An intense beam of light cuts through tissue by heating and vaporizing it. However, your cat risks lameness and behavioral problems as if it amputation was performed. Another way to declaw cats is the tendonectomy procedure; the tendon that controls the claw in each toe is severed. Your cat keeps his claws, but won’t be able to control them or extend them to scratch. This procedure requires more frequent nail trimmings. People often mistakenly believe that declawing their cats is a harmless “quick fix” for unwanted scratching. They don’t realize that declawing can make a cat less likely to use the litter box or more likely to bite. Declawing also can cause lasting physical problems for your cat. The Humane Society of the United States Let’s face it; scratching is a normal behavior for cats. Cats scratch to mark their territory and stretch their muscles. Scratching also removes the dead husks from their claws. You see. Cats don’t scratch so they can destroy your favorite chair! Before you get your cat declawed (can be expensive), consider the following 10 alternative solutions. If you love your cat, don’t put him or her through unnecessary pain. Don’t take away their right to scratch. 3 Alternative... read more

8 Simple Ways to Introduce a Cat to Your Dog

  You did it! You adopted from the Parma Animal Shelter and can’t wait to introduce your cat to your dog. But, oh no! Your cat gets scared and runs off because your love-bug of a dog wants to play. What do you do? The first thing to do is to remain calm. The second thing is to continue reading to find out how to introduce a cat to your dog. Consider These Things about a Cat and Dog Cats and dogs may play together and amuse themselves while left alone for long periods. But getting a cat or another cat as company for the other pet(s) does not mean that the animals will require less time from people. All companion animals need to develop and enjoy strong bonds with people, so another animal actually means a larger time commitment from the owner. If you’re considering bringing home another pet, you should also be aware of the potential problems that may develop. The introduction of a new animal is always going to be stressful for a resident pet, and stress has a way of finding an outlet (cats may become un-housetrained, and, in some cases, direct aggression towards their owners, as well as towards the “old pet”, the dog). Since introducing a new animal is stressful to the pet residents, it makes sense not to do it at a time when they are already under stress—when you have just moved to a new house or apartment, or when recovering from an illness or injury. Dogs are very routine-oriented; they like things done in the same way, at the same time,... read more

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